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Shopping

The custom of taking back gifts from your trip (omiyage) is firmly rooted in Japanese culture. Watch out for regional omiyage – typically food, pre-wrapped and ready to give to friends and family – conveniently available alongside the memento variety of souvenirs.

Kuroshio Market

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Souvenirs

Souvenir shops offer a wide range of charms, keepsakes and other cute stuff popular amongst the Japanese. Tourist spots often have souvenir shops close-by, as do rest stops known as michi-no-eki, and markets.

Souvenirs

Souvenir shops offer a wide range of charms, keepsakes and other cute stuff popular amongst the Japanese. Tourist spots often have souvenir shops close-by, as do rest stops known as michi-no-eki, and markets.

Gourmet Souvenirs

Every region of Japan has its hallmark, but Wakayama is fortunate to have several, and one of those is fruit. Renowned throughout the country, Nanko Ume plums are typically pickled in salt and eaten as umeboshi (salt-pickled plums good to eat with rice). Ume plums are also fused to make umeshu liqueur; the nigori (unfiltered) variety is particularly delicious. Keep your eyes peeled, as the bounty of Wakayama’s fruit will appear in all manner of alimentary goods, from dipping sauces such as ponzu to desserts. Two iconic Japanese symbols for which Wakayama is famous are soy sauce and binchotan fine white charcoal. Both originate from Wakayama, and you can still buy Yuasa traditional soy sauce – a taste unchanged from feudal times. The deeper you delve into Wakayama’s past, the more interesting the region's food culture becomes.

Gourmet Souvenirs

Every region of Japan has its hallmark, but Wakayama is fortunate to have several, and one of those is fruit. Renowned throughout the country, Nanko Ume plums are typically pickled in salt and eaten as umeboshi (salt-pickled plums good to eat with rice). Ume plums are also fused to make umeshu liqueur; the nigori (unfiltered) variety is particularly delicious. Keep your eyes peeled, as the bounty of Wakayama’s fruit will appear in all manner of alimentary goods, from dipping sauces such as ponzu to desserts. Two iconic Japanese symbols for which Wakayama is famous are soy sauce and binchotan fine white charcoal. Both originate from Wakayama, and you can still buy Yuasa traditional soy sauce – a taste unchanged from feudal times. The deeper you delve into Wakayama’s past, the more interesting the region's food culture becomes.

Wakayama Arts and Crafts

Craftsmanship is synonymous with Japanese culture. For millennia, the austere tradition of monozukuri, literally 'creating things', has been a way of life. Though shapes, materials, details and even tastes may evolve, the commitment to craftsmanship continues. Bringing home an example of Wakayama craftsmanship is not only an exceptional memento, it is also to the opportunity to become part of a long history, and the community sustaining a culture of craft and creation.

Wakayama Arts and Crafts

Craftsmanship is synonymous with Japanese culture. For millennia, the austere tradition of monozukuri, literally 'creating things', has been a way of life. Though shapes, materials, details and even tastes may evolve, the commitment to craftsmanship continues. Bringing home an example of Wakayama craftsmanship is not only an exceptional memento, it is also to the opportunity to become part of a long history, and the community sustaining a culture of craft and creation.

Shopping Malls & Markets

The variety of shopping spots, seafood and farmers markets in Wakayama showcase regional produce; sample food as you shop to your heart's content. Selections often include prepared foods, dry goods and traditional craft products as well as fresh ingredients that can sometimes be barbecued and eaten at the place of purchase. Wakayama markets are the perfect place to pick-up omiyage. Rest stops (michi-no-eki) along main roads, are also worth a visit, and typically offer goods from the surrounding area.

Toretore Market

Shopping Malls & Markets

The variety of shopping spots, seafood and farmers markets in Wakayama showcase regional produce; sample food as you shop to your heart's content. Selections often include prepared foods, dry goods and traditional craft products as well as fresh ingredients that can sometimes be barbecued and eaten at the place of purchase. Wakayama markets are the perfect place to pick-up omiyage. Rest stops (michi-no-eki) along main roads, are also worth a visit, and typically offer goods from the surrounding area.

TRAVEL CONCIERGE